Wooden railway horses rescued from a haystack

Introduction

A wooden railway horse has been rescued from an industrial site in Sydney’s south-east after it was stuck in the haystack.

Key points:The horse was spotted by a local and its owner had to be rescuedThe horse had a broken collarboneThe owner had an emergency call about a horse that had a fractured collarboneA group of people helped the horse to safetyThe owner said he and his wife had been out walking with their horses when they spotted the animal in the distance and called police.

“I said ‘what’s that, it’s got a broken neck,'” he said.

“It’s a horse, it needs to be taken to the vet and there’s no time left, they have to go.”

The animal was found by a passerby who called the animal rescue organisation and said they could take it to a veterinarian.

“The horse is a pretty big horse and it was obviously a bit of a mess,” he said, adding that the owner and his partner had to rescue the horse.

“There was a broken leg and a collarbone, there was a bit more broken than we expected.”

The owner, who did not want to be named, said he was still working to find out what had happened.

“We’re just trying to work out what’s happened,” he told ABC Local Radio.

“To me it was probably a bit rough on the neck but I think we just made a big mistake and I’m very sorry.”

The horse, which was named Woody, was found in the middle of the night by a group of neighbours in the suburb of Maitland on Tuesday.

The owners had been driving down the street when they saw the animal stuck in a hay pile.

“They got down and got down in front of the barn and pulled the horse off the hay, and I think it’s a bit sad that it’s taken that long to get out,” Mr Mollison said.

The horse needed emergency surgery to repair the broken collar bone and the collar was removed.

“After the operation the horse was quite stiff, but it was OK,” Mr Bong told the ABC.

The owner was able to rescue Woody but said he had to put the animal down and take the rest of the hay to the local veterinary clinic.

“Woody was still quite stiff but it did come out OK, we put it down and taken it to the vets,” he added.

“If we hadn’t been out there I don’t think we would have found him.”

Topics:animal-welfare,animal-attacks,animal,sustainable-development,southern-australia,southeast-asia,sydney-2000

wooden railway henry

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